Scale & Interval Patterns for Guitar

A Complete Guide to Melodic & Harmonic Intervals from Major, Melodic Minor, & Harmonic Minor Scale Harmony


This page contains samples from a longer video course.
Please visit wayoftheguitar.com for more info.

Introduction & Overview

This course is a complete guide to scale & interval patterns for guitar.

Based on the widely-accepted “CAGED” system utilized by the world’s most prominent guitarists and teachers, it examines Major, Melodic Minor, & Harmonic Minor scale & interval patterns in all keys and positions, relating everything to the five most common major chord shapes.

Though this course includes music theory, its primary focus is on the practicalities of recognizing, practicing, and memorizing Major, Melodic Minor, & Harmonic Minor scales, and melodic & harmonic intervals, on the guitar. 

Improvisation & ear training are strongly emphasized.

Objectives

“CAGED” scales are one of the most productive investments of your practice time, regardless of style, genre, or level.

Your reading, aural skills, and technique will continually improve if you integrate this material into your daily practice; the course closes with a detailed six-week practice plan to show you how.

By expanding into melodic & harmonic intervals you’ll develop a flexible technical approach, and also a keen ear for the building blocks of melody and harmony; a direct path to fret-board mastery!


Chapter One:
Major Scales in the Five “CAGED” Forms & Harmonic Seconds on Two-String Groups: Major Scale Harmony

1. Introduction to the CAGED System


2. “C” Form of C Major

Our first scale pattern is the “C” form of C Major.

We call it the “C” form because the scale tones surround the basic C Major chord in open position.

Practice the scale ascending from the lowest available scale tone, and descending from the highest available scale tone.

Cycle through the scale for a few repetitions, striving to create an even sound and to connect each note with the next.

If you are using a pick, alternate, down then up; if you are using your right-hand fingers, alternate index then middle.

Next, reverse the order: alternate pick the scale starting on an up-stroke, or, in the case of finger-style playing, begin with the middle finger.

Sounding the C chord first, then singing the scale’s note names while playing, will help tremendously as you develop your ear.

3. “A” Form of C Major

Our second scale pattern is the “A” form of C Major.

We call it the “A” form because the scale tones surround the basic C Major bar chord in third position. Note that this bar chord form is derived from the common A major form in open position.

We will practice this form in the same manner as the “C” form:

Practice the scale ascending from the lowest available scale tone, and descending from the highest available scale tone.

Cycle through the scale for a few repetitions, striving to create an even sound and to connect each note with the next.

If you are using a pick, alternate, down then up; if you are using your right-hand fingers, alternate index then middle.

Next, reverse the order: alternate pick the scale starting on an up-stroke, or, in the case of finger-style playing, begin with the middle finger.

Remember: sounding the C chord first, then singing the scale’s note names while playing, will help tremendously as you develop your ear.

4. “G” Form of C Major

Our third scale pattern is the “G” form of C Major.

We call it the “G” form because the scale tones surround the basic C Major bar chord in fifth position. Note that this bar chord form is derived from the common G major form in open position.

We will practice this form in the same manner as the previous forms:

Practice the scale ascending from the lowest available scale tone, and descending from the highest available scale tone.

Cycle through the scale for a few repetitions, striving to create an even sound and to connect each note with the next.

If you are using a pick, alternate, down then up; if you are using your right-hand fingers, alternate index then middle.

Next, reverse the order: alternate pick the scale starting on an up-stroke, or, in the case of finger-style playing, begin with the middle finger.

Remember: sounding the C chord first, then singing the scale’s note names while playing, will help tremendously as you develop your ear.

5. “E” Form of C Major

Our fourth scale pattern is the “E” form of C Major.

We call it the “E” form because the scale tones surround the basic C Major bar chord in eighth position. Note that this bar chord form is derived from the common E major form in open position.

We will practice this form in the same manner as the previous forms:

Practice the scale ascending from the lowest available scale tone, and descending from the highest available scale tone.

Cycle through the scale for a few repetitions, striving to create an even sound and to connect each note with the next.

If you are using a pick, alternate, down then up; if you are using your right-hand fingers, alternate index then middle.

Next, reverse the order: alternate pick the scale starting on an up-stroke, or, in the case of finger-style playing, begin with the middle finger.

Remember: sounding the C chord first, then singing the scale’s note names while playing, will help tremendously as you develop your ear.


6. “D” Form of C Major

Our fifth, and final scale pattern, is the “D” form of C Major.

We call it the “D” form because the scale tones surround the basic C Major chord in tenth position. Note that this chord form is derived from the common D major form in open position.

We will practice this form in the same manner as the previous forms:

Practice the scale ascending from the lowest available scale tone, and descending from the highest available scale tone.

Cycle through the scale for a few repetitions, striving to create an even sound and to connect each note with the next.

If you are using a pick, alternate, down then up; if you are using your right-hand fingers, alternate index then middle.

Next, reverse the order: alternate pick the scale starting on an up-stroke, or, in the case of finger-style playing, begin with the middle finger.

Remember: sounding the C chord first, then singing the scale’s note names while playing, will help tremendously as you develop your ear.

7. Harmonic Seconds:
C Major, Two-String Groups

Harmonic Seconds: C Major, Two-String Groups


Looking for the rest of this course? Please visit:

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“Comprehensive training in fret-board harmony, aural skills, & improvisation. Empowering guitarists of all styles & levels on the path to musical fluency.”

www.wayoftheguitar.com