Triads with Doublings and Suspended 4ths (Harmonized Scale: “D” Harmonic Minor)

The following examples show various four-note triadic constructions with doublings and suspensions moved through a “D” Harmonic Minor scale.

The first chord is a commonly played triad with a duplicated root. The intervals, stacked vertically, are as follows: 5th, 4th, & 3rd. The intervallic construction is maintained and moved through the harmonized scale:

Next, the 3d is suspended (replaced with a diatonic fourth) and the resulting 5th, 4th & 4th construction is moved through the scale:

The second voicing type is a triad with a duplicated 3rd. The intervals, stacked vertically, are as follows: 3rd, 4th, & 3rd. The intervallic structure is maintained and moved through the harmonized scale:

Next, the upper 3d is suspended (replaced with a diatonic fourth) and the resulting 3rd, 4th & 4th construction is moved through the scale:

The third construction is a triad with a duplicated 5th. The intervals, stacked vertically, are as follows: 4th, 3rd, & 3rd. The intervallic structure is maintained and moved through the harmonized scale:

Next, the 3d is suspended (replaced with a diatonic fourth) and the resulting 4th, 4th & 2nd construction is moved through the scale:

Try finding additional four-note triads with duplicate notes or “doublings.” Here are two other possible starting chords:

Also, try transferring these voicings onto other string sets. Here is one of the previous chords transposed down an octave and placed on string set 5432:

Finally, experiment with various scales. Harmonic Minor is particularly useful, however, as it contains Major, Minor, Diminished, and Augmented triads.

The Augmented Scale

The augmented scale is a symmetrical hexatonic scale.

It appears in music by composers as varied as Franz Liszt, Alberto Ginastera, Béla Bartók, Milton Babbitt, Arnold Schoenberg, John Coltrane, Oliver Nelson, and Michael Brecker.

There are various ways to derive the augmented scale:

  • start with an augmented triad and add a 1/2 below each tone
  • alternate minor thirds with 1/2 steps
  • combine two augmented triads an augmented second (or minor third) apart: C E G♯ and E♭ G B

Below are fretboard diagrams for the augmented scale, starting on the root C, then moving through the cycle of fourths through all 12 keys.

Try improvising melodic lines, diads, and triads, exploring the symmetries that this unique scale creates.

Root “C”:

Root “F”:

Root “B♭” or “A#”:

Root “E♭” or “D#”:

Root “A♭” or “G#”:

Root “D♭” or “C#”:

Root “G♭” or “F#”:

Root “B”:

Root “E”:

Root “A”:

Root “D”:

Root “G”:

4-String Quartal Voicings (Adjacent String Sets)

These quartal voicings sound amazing and are an easy way to incorporate more color into your playing.

They can be analyzed in a variety of ways (from various roots), making them particularly useful for chord embellishment and substitution.